Christianity and Segregation Part 3: Modern Groups

Last time around, we dealt with discussions of older Christian segregationists, demonstrating where these positions are coming from, and why the basis’ suggested are poor. Today, I want to discuss some of the more current movements.

  1. Premillennial arguments against interracial marriage

Before someone attempts to suggest that I am making a false accusation against premillennial believers or dispensationalists, let me state for the record I am a mild dispensationalist, and both premillennial and hold to a pretribulational rapture. Premillenialism is not precisely new to the twentieth and twenty-first century (as some falsely allege), but the there was a major resurgence of the twentieth and twenty-first century. During this period popular forms often made missteps, including arguments that interracial marriage was building the kingdom of the anti-Christ, in similar terms to Christian compromises with other religions. This had a resurgence in the seventies in part because of responses to liberal social engineering and the tumult over issues such as busing.

The problem with this line of thought is two fold. First, the argument rests on the assumption that we are to prevent the kingdom of anti-Christ from rising. The presentation of the anti-Christ is that this is a part of God’s plan, not man’s. Secondarily, the argument that interethnic marriage leads to the kingdom of Anti-Christ is similarly flawed; technically speaking the argument linking interethnic marriage to Anti-Christ is a “non-sequitar.”

  1. Christian Identity, Positive Christianity, and British Israelism

To those who are unaware, “positive Christianity” was a reinterpretation of Christianity by the early Nazi party (and for those who argue that the Nazis were a Christian regime, one must ask the question, if so why did they feel the need to change historic doctrines). Positive Christianity reinterpreted the gospels by means of liberal Christian theology into a racial struggle. British Israelism (and its American cousin Christian Identity) similarly reinterprets the Bible in racial terms, arguing that Whites are the true Israelites and are the only ones who can be saved. They completely ignore Paul’s discussions of the gentiles and Jews both being part of the Church.

These are racist ideologies that are actually PseudoChristian, and qualify as cults. Many atheists, however, do not appear to understand that these groups do not accept the historic tenants of the Christian faith.

  1. Kinism

Kinism is another modern take on segreationalism. Getting accurate information on Kinism is more difficult, many of their older, formulative blogs by kinists are now defunct. Current kinist blogs are unimpressive, often using ad hominem argumentation, and a certain degree of self deception (equality is not of God, but we aren’t racists, we are racialists). When I first checked a Kinist facebook page, I found a number of neo-nazi pictures and formulations, including a statement that equality was not of God. Later some of these had been cleansed, whether this is because they felt the neo-nazi symbols did not reflect their position and was due to infiltration by another element or whether this was for propagandistic reasons is something I do not claim to know. Kinism is rooted in an extreme version of reformed theology (connected to an idea called reconstructionism, which argues essentially that Christians should build a nation state operating under the Old Testament law, Paul’s statements to the contrary notwithstanding) and makes the argument that is similar to the discussion of the premillennial take on the tower of Babel.

What I think I can say reasonably about Kinism is that it may be a sugarcoating of actual racism as I defined it in my terms in part 1. The presence and toleration of neo-nazi symbols indicates that at least many kinists are racists. Much of what I said about Premillenial views would hold true.

Now that we have discussed the positions, we will move to the common arguments raised by Christian segregationists.

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